Friday, May 27, 2016

Wine Tip of the Week: Eat This Drink That Series - Pairing Wine with Fish

The classic recommendation to serve white wine with fish is for the most part a good one - but far too general to be of any help at all.  There are many, many types of fish and many, many, (many) types of white wines so the classic recommendation is not as straightforward as it may sound.  Here are some simple rules to remember based on what I call the "fighting class" of the fish you will be eating.

Lightweight Class.  
Fish: Light and flakey fish with a mild flavor. Examples - Tilapia, Bass.
WIne Pairing:  Light and crisp wines - Sauvignon Blanc (some NZ and CA examples may be too flavorful - try Washington or Loire). Spanish Whites such as Albariño, Spanish Cava or Verdejo, and the über food friendly Grüner Veltliner. (Yes - double umlaut sentence - I am a wild man!). Stay away from Chardonnay (unless very light and unoaked), and Viogner, both would overpower your lightweight contender of a fish.

Middleweight Class.
Fish: Flakey fish, but with more pronounced flavors. Examples - Trout, Catfish, Halibut.
Wine Pairing: These fish can take a wine with a bit more flavor. Try Chardonnay (can be oaked, but be careful with super oaky, buttery, high alcohol versions). Riesling (Washington or Dry German Kabinett level). Sauvignon Blanc (more flavorful versions from California, New Zealand or Pouilly Fume). Italian Soave is another very food friendly white with a bit bolder flavor.

Heavyweight Class. 
Fish: Meatier fish such as Salmon, Mahi Mahi, Shark, Swordfish, Tuna, or Monkfish.
Wine Pairing: Bring on the flavor! Oaky Chardonnay, Viognier,  Dry Rośe, Champagne, White Rhone (France). You can even start to introduce light bodied reds at this weight class - stick with lightweight, fruity versions of Pinot Noir, Rioja, or Cotes du Rhone.

Small but Powerful. 
Fish: Oily, "fishy" ones such as Anchovies, Sardines, Herring, or Mackerel.
Wine Pairing: Acidity will help cut through the oil. Whites:  Oaky Chardonnay, fuller bodied Sauvignon Blanc or a crisp, dry Rośe.  Reds - Lighter, fruitier Pinot Noir, Rioja, Chianti.

Don't be afraid of red wine and fish - the "white with white, red with red" advice is far too conservative for a wino to ever live by!  You can crush a delicate fish with a red wine, but the right light bodied, slightly fruity, and nicely acidic red can bring a whole new aspect to your fish dishes!

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Weekly Wine Review - California Rosé - 2015 Chase Cellars Zinfandel Rosé Hayne Vineyard

Like many of my era, some of my first wine that didn't come from a convenience store (shout out to Boone's Farm) was White Zinfandel.  Beringer? No way - I rocked mostly some Robert Mondavi Woodbridge.  After growing up drinking sugary sodas and "juices" from Hi-C out of a can (no need to refrigerate sugar water with extra preservatives), my taste buds seem to gravitate to the sweeter pink wines on my grocer's counters.  These memories made me smile when we received our latest wine club shipment from the awesome Zin-masters at Chase Cellars.  A rosé of Zinfandel you say.... a white Zinfandel by a fancier name I say.  Neither Mondavi's or Chase's are white anyway... so I guess Rosé is the better term.  It's been a while since I've had a... whatever name you want to call it... so let's see how the 2015 version stands up to those wines of old!